Over the long term, how often will AA lose a hand?

As it stands, I feel this is a bad question. I was going to leave a comment on how to make it a good question, and the only way I could imagine making this a real question is cite a number of opponents and their ranges. At that point, it becomes a "plug it into poker stove" question.

Will questions like this be guided to "good question" territory with comments? If so, how does this one become good? Or should it just be closed as not constructive?

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My thoughts were that this was too vague a question when I saw it. There are just too many "it depends" situations with these types of queries that it would need an answer as long as a book. –  Toby Booth Jan 12 '12 at 14:38
    
@Toby can it be improved? –  Chris Marasti-Georg Jan 12 '12 at 14:41
    
To me it sounds as if it's a ill defined equity question. That said, it's wrong to assume that everyone will be able to understand the role that equity plays and so they may not even be able to ask the right question? Other than making the question more situational, I'd say no. Also, I noted this from the FAQ "Your questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much." –  Toby Booth Jan 12 '12 at 14:45
    
I think if it were changed to something like "Why does AA lose so often at showdown?" it could be a better question. –  msergeant Jan 12 '12 at 15:58
    
I actually think this question is interesting so long as it isn't answered as pure hot-cold equity, though a good answer would address a specific case of hand playability. If anything the question is too broad. –  Loc Nguyen Jul 20 '12 at 16:47

1 Answer 1

I would start with the answer. "ANY hand will lose MOST of the time against a large field. In a field of ten, AA will lose 70% of the time. That means it WINS 30%, or THREE times more than its "statistical" 10%.

I edited the question to read as follows (it was "rolled" back): AA is the best hand. Why does it often lose?

If you use this version of the question, together with my answer, that probably makes a viable "set." I'm open to other viable variations.

The above represented the first of my two attempts to fix this question. Both were rejected by a moderator. Unless someone can do a better job of fixing it than yours truly, it might just be better to delete the question.

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